Category Archives: Nitro

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Cancer Research UK Gets Social with HCPs

Cancer Research UK aim to bring forward the day when all cancers are cured. More people than ever before are being diagnosed with cancer in the UK, and in particular, rates of oral cancer have risen dramatically in the last 10 years. Cancer Research UK, supported by the British Dental Association and accredited by the Royal College of General Practitioners, developed an Oral Cancer Recognition Toolkit to promote and support the early diagnosis of oral cancer by dentists and GPs. The toolkit includes a video, recognition and referral aids, case studies and other resources to help support best practice in the prevention and early detection of oral cancer.

Nitro Digital was chosen for the project based on its in-depth knowledge of the healthcare space and its methodical, multidimensional approach to strategising and executing successful online marketing campaigns and its knowledge of how to connect and engage with HCPs online. Taking the lead from Nitro, a tactical digital strategy and plan were developed to harness social media channels to drive awareness and targeted visitors to the appropriate toolkit. The campaign was timed to run for two weeks during Mouth Cancer Action Month (November 2016), and the toolkits were placed on two key healthcare websites, chosen specifically for their relevant readership. Nitro launched  a two-pronged social media planning and buying campaign, selecting two channels (Facebook and LinkedIn) to direct traffic to the landing pages. Ad creative and messaging was tailored to each audience. Chosen KPIs included clicks, impressions, CTR, CPC and using GA.

As this was an experiment for the client, learnings were key. Cancer Research UK had not used social media to reach HCPs before, so there was great interest in seeing how well the campaign would perform. Overall, it delivered strong results and as the CPC was not significantly different from what the client was used to seeing when targeting the general public, they were pleasantly surprised. Nitro, too, was pleased with the initial results, as they demonstrate the opportunity for improvement in the future, with learnings from this pilot effort informing new HCP-centric campaigns going forward. Most important, however, the campaign proved that digital marketing could achieve results and provide insight into audience behaviour that could be used to refine future, similar online activity.

Both medical professionals and patients are becoming increasingly digitally savvy. Social media, in particular, is likely to have a major impact in the way that pharma communicates in the coming years. 52% of physicians surveyed by Deloitte expressed interest in communicating with pharma companies via social media.* Massive opportunities await for those brands that embrace this new digital engagement.

* http://www.slideshare.net/Market_iT/pharma-adoption-of-social-media-a-prescription-for-physician-engagement, published Jan 2016

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Digital Pharma Advances Conference Recap

We recently participated in the annual Digital Pharma Advances Conference in London, 2017. As a sponsor, we had both an exhibition stand and speaking slot; and when we weren’t engaged in our sponsorship duties, we had time to enjoy the speaking programme and the wonderful networking opportunities. Here are a few of our takeaways.

The conference programme consisted of a full day of presentations by high level executives from companies such as GSK, Bayer, Pfizer and AstraZeneca, to name a few, as well as sponsors such ourselves.

The key takeaway undoubtedly was:

 

Where, when and how to engage best with our customers have changed dramatically, so it’s imperative to provide the right information to the right customer through the right channel at the right time.

img_0691Berfin Demirbilek, Integrated Multi channel Marketing Manager, Region EMEA, Bayer spoke on the topic of “Integrated Multichannel Marketing Strategy and Do’s for Digital Transformation”.

She emphasised that the “reality is to be in micro-moments: moments that truly matter” and that only a clear strategy and defined steps can make digital transformation successful.

Tim Cave, VP, Head Medical Affairs Strategic Planning & Digital Practice, GSK spoke on ”Leveraging & Optimising New Technologies & Trends To Deliver Influential, Targeted Engagement”. He, too, stressed that the world is changing, and there are many opportunities to improve trust and communication. He then discussed how GSK is changing their model to make interactions more convenient for HCPs and provided example of virtual meetings and the company’s learnings.

Marketing Manager at Bayer HealthCare, Bayer Pharmaceuticals, Pelin Icil’s mantra was: Reach-Engage-Interest-Convert.

For Kasia Hein-Peters, Vaxelis Marketing Head, Sanofi Pasteur, the localisation of global integrated communications was the topic of the day.

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And, of course, the presentation from our own commercial director Andy Stafford “Let’s not do the same old, same old in digital” touched on these very points—and more.

From the current state of play in the industry to the idea that we now live in an “always on” world to the opportunity to leverage both the greater efficiencies and education that digital can provide, Andy emphasised the need to constantly adapt and learn, to change the mindset from delivering merely outputs to embracing illuminating outcomes in order to provide the best value for customers—HCPS and patients alike—and, ultimately, success for your business goals.

If you’d like a copy, please email us at hello@nitro-digital.com. We look forward to hearing from you!

 

2017-Nitro Digital-vision-graphic

2017: The life sciences marketplace and the imperative for change

Let me start the year not with a retrospective, but with a call out to what we want to build at Nitro.

First off, it’s worth stating what we believe, or rather hypothesise:

  • That a fundamental shift must occur in the way the life sciences industry approaches marketing.
  • That this is necessary in order to make healthcare sustainable. Life sciences companies are major contributors to R&D, and their participation in society is not only necessary, but vital.
  • That the companies that are best placed to contribute will not be just those with the right drug at the right price, but those which, having got that mix right, are then able to combine it with collaborative HCPs and a layer of digital and communication services that support either real work outcomes, professional collaboration or patient care.
  • That the way to achieve this goal is not simply using sales reps as glorified delivery men and women. I’d go further, and say that few doctors want to see reps anymore for product information alone.
  • That creating a new promotional and educational distribution model for the pharma industry is not easy, nor is there a single silver bullet. Healthcare is, so far, reluctant to see the rise of an Alibaba or Uber in its sector; perhaps it will come, but perhaps the system is too fragmented, complex and non-commoditised for that. (although, if you continue the Alibaba analogy, that would make it ideal for a bit of disruption. . .which brings me to my next point nearly).
  • That everyone wins if a more efficient, digitally enabled, two-sided market emerges in healthcare.
  • That technology is essentially borderless and has the power to effect global change in our industry as much as it has in others.

We started Nitro 15 years ago based on these beliefs. We believe them now. Achieving a solution to the issues created by the challenges above has proved elusive, but I genuinely believe we have developed the scale and expertise in what is an ever moving tech and process stack that means we can take major steps forward in 2017 towards helping our clients find more efficient, tech-enabled ways of engaging with HCPS, patients and other stakeholders for better healthcare overall.

Of course, the journey will not be competed this year, or the next, or perhaps ever. But maybe that’s part of the fun of it.

So, all that being said, we think we have—through some deep and testing experience—a clearer idea of what the makings of a two-sided marketplace for life sciences looks like and what this means for the sales and marketing model for the sector. We refer to this as life sciences social closed loop marketing (CLM), and at the heart of it is a powerful combination of a BuzzFeed-esque content marketing model, a tech stack configured to cope with the regulatory and global nuances of our industry, and a data-driven understanding of customer experience and the means and modes of acquisition and retention. Ultimately, to us it’s about helping life sciences companies build up their own proprietary distribution channels.

Here’s what it could look like:

Life-Sciences-Social-CLM-diagram

In our opinion, life sciences companies need to work iteratively (emphasis on iterative collaborative working) to build the following business processes and tech stack to compete effectively in the world that awaits us.

  • A Content Engine that contains the people, processes and tools to deliver high quality, targeted, relevant (to the audience’s needs) and consistent content in a variety of media types. It should produce creative and ethical content backed by science, and conforming to modern internet content marketing techniques: think Buzz Feed meets the BMJ! Notably, the resulting items should be incredibly timely and published more frequently. There should be a mix of interactive, service-based and information communication, most of which will be curated and created by KOLs. This content engine is not just about production, but also technologies that facilitate the creation, curation and publishing of content, like Nitro’s own proprietary ULTRA Buzz system, the Veeva Vault or web services like Grammarly.
  • A Multichannel Publishing System, whether it’s an owned media one using a CMS-like Drupal or Adobe’s Creative Cloud, or using earned platforms, like Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn or Twitter.
  • An Acquisition Strategy, since we know from having built thousands of sites that ‘build it and they will come’ just doesn’t work in the life sciences sector. Marketers, therefore, must (in our humble opinion) have an effective user acquisition strategy in place using a mix of media tailored specifically to their target audience’s needs, to be able to reach them where and when they want to be reached. Nitro’s media effectiveness database assembled using over a decade of data-driven experience allows for easy budget optimisation across a range of disparate media channels and across a full range of therapy areas.

All of the above creates visibility for your online assets, but as the cost of media in our industry is relatively high, it’s critical to provide an engaging interaction and to extend the ROI beyond the first visit. To encourage this ‘stickiness’  you’ll need:

  • A Measurement/Analytics plan, as well as a Customer Experience and Data Management strategy, whether it’s gathering feedback through net promoter score usage or other surveys; data from interactive services,; creating cookie-dropped user tag lists; email capture or sign up; or analytic services such as Google or Adobe using their respective tag managers. This activity is primarily to ensure you deliver and can measure the value you are providing but also about allowing you to segment and augment data so that you can:
  • Pull data back into and sync with your CRM (Veeva, Agnito, Salesforce) (data extension strategy) and enable your KAMs and other colleagues to leverage it, and;
  • Critically—and so far largely absent in our industry—a retargeting strategy utilising not just valuable and relevant high frequency content (see 1 above!) and email, but also cookie and data-driven and programmatic retargeting marketplaces. Talk to me any day about the relative ROI of buying media in this way compared to the cost of initial acquisition. This is the realisation of a core internet economy principle, the development by brands of their own proprietary distribution channel.
  • Finally, the output of all these efforts can’t be directly about shifting ‘drug product’ through share of voice (through that last point plays an import role in acquisition). It’s about (again, in our opinion) building genuine advocacy through listening, responding and partnering. This builds trust and will at scale be reflected in content creation which if you follow the logic through will create a virtuous circle fuelling the company’s content engine (see the diagram above!). Beautiful!

So that’s it in a nutshell. It’s not a simple vision, way more complex than just content and communications but, if successful, way more valuable for all concerned. It would be amazing to build a company that delivered on this.

That’s our plan. 2017 and beyond.

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5th Digital Pharma Advances Conference

The 5th Digital Pharma Advances Conference returns to London at the end of January and our Commercial Director Andy Stafford will be presenting both at this event and the workshop the next day. 

Attendees will get a glimpse into the future of pharma, hearing from industry leaders about digital trends, value-add services and engagement opportunities, and the technologies and innovations that will benefit not just marketing and sales but also public health.

Andy-Stafford-headshotAndy will speak on the topic Multi-channel Integration: Test & Learn To Engage In Digital.

When: 31st January 2017, 14:05-14:20
Where: Millennium Mayfair Hotel, Central London

At the workshop, Innovative Social Media, Digital & Measurement Strategies, Andy will lead discussion on the topic Let’s Improve Digital Engagement, Now. 

When:
1st February 2017, 10-10:20
Where: Millennium Mayfair Hotel, Central London

We’ll be exhibiting at the conference on the 31st, stop by and say hi if you’re attending. We’d love to speak with you.

About-Nitro-0

Meet the Nitro Digital team

Welcome to the first in a series of interviews with the Nitro Digital team! Here we meet Piotr Sikora (Lead Front End Developer) who talks about cutting edge IT, increasing services for clients, his new book, and connections between breakdancing and developing!

Piotr

Hello and thank you for being interviewed for the Nitro Digital blog!

Firstly, please tell us about your role is at Nitro, and where you fit in the team? How long have you worked here?
Hi all! I’m glad that I can give you an interview. I’m a lead front end developer at Nitro Digital. I started working here 3 years ago (in 2013) when the Polish department was about 7 people in a small office.

Could you say more about your role and the sorts of projects you’re involved in?
Currently my role is related mainly with Front End logic and web technologies/languages like HTML CSS and JavaScript including frameworks like Foundation, Angular, Phonegap etc. I’m a lead developer so I’m looking for new technologies we can use as a team, and I’m supporting all developers in the team. I’m working on the parts of projects which the client can see in a browser – so for example this can be interactive websites, and also mobile apps and email templates.

So looking for ways to improve interactivity and user experience has led you to write a book on Professional CSS3 – tell us about this! Is it very related to your work aims?
Yes exactly it is strictly related to my work aims. I started working on the book about nine months ago. The funniest thing about working on book is the main question of each good developer: “who has time to write a book?” So I had a time to do that because I wanted to share my knowledge with other developers.

This book is for people who want to get more knowledge about CSS. If you are a beginner you can read this book as I’ve tried to explain all aspects of CSS as simply as I could. If you are a pro developer you can find some tricks which I use, and rebuild them for your needs. Hopefully this book will be helpful for all people who wants to know more about CSS.

It’s great to produce something technical that will be useful to all levels. I see you’re a b-boy (break dancer) in you spare time – please say more?
I’ve been a b-boy for about 17 years. I started dancing when I was teenager with a friend from my neighborhood. It was easy for me to start dancing because I trained in Karate for about 10 years and my body was ready for it. Break dance showed me how to use the foundation of dance with my own creativity to create my own style. It made me more aware who I want to be and how can I make myself better in other areas.

I’m still dancing and try to teach kids and teenagers. It gives me big satisfaction that some of my students are now dancing like pro b-boys. I’m a judge too. After a years of passion, it’s great to see how this culture is still evolving and how young people are creative.

So it takes a lot of discipline?
Yes for sure but I’m not so radical right now. When you are a contender you need to keep your training routine. Now I’m making it only for my enjoyment. I’m happy that when I’m dancing in home my daughter is trying to do it too. And she is so happy when she is doing it!

Sounds like you’re someone who’s interested in developing – dance, sport, technology. Is there anything front end you’d like to see in the future, or think will develop? Anything we should look out for?
The technology is still moving forward. Back in the day I was a Flash Developer and I’ve been involved in projects which were based on augmented reality. I hope it will be possible to make it in JavaScript in near future. I’m still trying to be on time and one of things which I like right now is Internet Of Things (IOT). I bought Raspberry Pi about 3 months ago and made a simple application in Node.JS. So maybe it can be a project related with IOT. It’s rather hard to make an application for dancers but maybe some day I will find a way to do it.

Is IOT being used in the healthcare/media sector?
Yes – there are a lot of ideas and products related to IOT and healthcare. This is a rising branch in IT and hopefully it will go a little bit out from IT sector.  I recently heard about projects related with diabetes which helps to dose drugs. As I mentioned this is still a rising branch and I hope it will revolutionise IT. We as developers just need to find the niche and create some extra products in this sector.

The Poland team has expanded a lot over recent times! Are you able to provide different services or projects now?
When I started working in Nitro Digital Poland there were 7 developers on board. All of us were working on our current workflow which was evolving to work on maximising our efficiency. We are still scaling and we are working on culture of work inside our company which is very important to keep the team motivation.

I think that the main difference is that we learned a lot on previous projects. We’re able to provide new products with new technologies and with better efficiency than ever. We have more time for research. We have a great QA team! The team has developed and is the best QA team which I could dream of. They are supporting developers in their work and for sure are the very important support of the development process. I hope that this evolution (almost revolution) will be kept and we will still be working on better projects which will satisfy our clients.

What would you say is your biggest success so far?
The biggest success is that we build so big team is such a short time. In last 12 months we made the Front End team from 3 to 16 developers. It was possible because of great people with whom I work everyday (thanks Marcin, Katarzyna, and all FEDevelopers @ Nitro Digital, Pete and Jules for all of possibilities). I think that this is the one of biggest successes. And I believe that this is just a warm up before something bigger!

Digital Assets Audit

Digital Asset Audits

Let’s face it: Most larger companies don’t have their digital assets in order. Teams across the globe commission their own assets, but a central overview and performance management system is often missing.

What are the typical problems?

Let’s start with a lack of a centralised list of assets. Your company might have thousands of websites, apps, social media accounts and other digital channels floating around the depths of the internet; in many different countries and languages. But a missing central overview of these assets runs counter to any effort of implementing a consistent digital marketing strategy across the company.

Performance and the monitoring of assets is another critical area. How does a company define success for its different digital assets? Which ones are performing, which ones aren’t? And: Is anybody even monitoring the performance? You’d be surprised how many corporate website owners have never looked at their on-site analytics or – worse yet – not even implemented it on their site(s).

Naturally, the bottom line is affected by an aimless array of digital assets without proper oversight as well. For one, the lack of oversight restricts coherent strategic planning as to which areas and assets to invest in and which are sufficiently covered. Furthermore, the lack of performance measurement effectively rules out the possibility to make data-driven decisions based on performance as well as to draw on internal best practices. And a truly unnecessary cost factor are thousands of either underperforming, forgotten or unused websites and domains that serve no clear purpose but still incur hosting fees.

I should also mention a special case for the pharmaceutical industry: compliance. Unmonitored websites with free text forms or unsupervised social media channels are any compliance manager’s worst nightmare.

Asset audits can help

The challenges a lack of oversight creates are clear. But what about solutions to the problem? One research exercise that can help is to conduct a digital assets audit.

From our experience at Nitro Digital, an audit typically starts with a number of different sources that list digital assets from around the company. These lists can be merged together into one master document which can then start as the basis for investigation. Depending on the requirements, it can be necessary to conduct a manual search for assets as well utilising search engines and other methods of investigation.

Once the template with the list of assets is set up, the information we collect can roughly be divided into two buckets: general asset & qualitative information gathered via investigation (e.g. type of website, target audience, language etc.) and the collection of performance, technical and other metrics (such as Alexa Traffic Rank and Moz authority metrics for websites, community size for social assets etc.). Learn more about comparative performance metrics for websites in one of my other posts.

For an individual website, it is in most cases appropriate to determine its status before anything else. Is it live and can be audited for the data we want to collect? Is it behind a log-in? Is it redirecting? Or is it non-resolving and can be classified as a domain without a live website on it?

Another useful piece of information to corporate digital marketers wanting to get a global overview of assets is the asset owner. In many cases this is not known and has to be established via manual investigation within the organisation. It’s a key piece of information, however, as it allows for later follow-up with the asset owner.

Outcomes of an assets audit

Following an audit, you end up with a host of invaluable information. You now have a centralised list of your digital assets (may not be 100% complete, but a great start nonetheless), complete with general information about the assets as well as performance data. This makes categorising and comparing assets quick and easy. Ideally, the audit has also generated full ownership information.

A lot of follow-on projects can come out of the original audit. You could for example create a methodology for scoring the identified assets and then decommission the ones that seem superfluous and invest in the ones worthy of development. Or you could pick certain assets and do a more specific follow-up audit on them, such as a pharmacovigilance compliance audit on all your websites.

Wherever you want to go with your digital strategy, a centralised and comprehensive overview of your assets is essential.